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    Thread: Average life expectancy of 2.0T FSI?

    1. Member
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      2007 Black B6 ___________ Passat, 2.0T ___________ 2004 Grey Silverado ___________ 1500, 5.3L Z71
      11-08-2019 06:50 PM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by TheGermanExperience View Post
      interesting read! I am in the same boat, with an 08 GTI with 125k mi, still stock. Did cam follower myself, plugs, coil packs around 80-90k. I had misfires and rough idle that was due to carbon deposits and got it cleaned up at 90k. I've also had the "low oil pressure" warning come on this particular almost 360deg on-ramp i hit hard, if the oil is even a half quart low - scary! What drives the oil pump - gears or chain driven? How is the LiquiMoly NewGen - I got it to check leaks (i burn/lose quite a bit of oil currently, it seems when i go up a mild long uphill grade i can smell a sweet oil smell - any ideas?). It was strange, some reviews on ECS said it made their engine sound better - I though that was a dubious claim but after the first change my car did seem to sound angrier and free-er. Perhaps a bad thing?
      The oil pump is chain driven. There is a sprocket on the end of the shaft that drives the oil pump and that sprocket is connected to the engine crankshaft via a chain. That is on one side of the oil pump unit as a whole. On the other side are also 2 balance shafts that are connected via gears to the oil pump shaft itself. The balance shafts are designed to balance out/mitigate vibrations from these highly strung engines and make things cushier in the cabin. Unfortunately these balance shafts are somewhat failure prone. On the far end of the balance shafts (opposite the oil pump shaft itself) there are almost cam-like ends where a majority of the weight (and thus conterbalancing) happens. The balance shafts rotate at 2x the speed of the crankshaft and they are rated for a max of 14,000RPMs. That means if you have a pretty modified car and can get near or exceed 7000 engine RPMs then you could cause balance shaft failure. At those speeds the cam-like ends can bind and that will immediately seize the gears on the other end and since those gears ultimately connect the balance shafts to the oil pump shaft itself that causes oil pump failure. For this reason, I have been meaning to cut out my balance shafts (they are non-essential) to decouple them from my oil pump shaft/sprocket as I track my car and it can reach 7400RPMs so I've been pushing my luck as it is. I'm actually going to be doing the delete soon so if I remember I'll post some pictures on here (or you can just check my build thread because I will post them there).

      Another bonus of deleting the balance shafts is that it increases your oil capacity but up to 1L which makes it much more unlikely that you'll encounter oil delivery issues in super tight right-hand corners. Normally in really tight right-handers and round-abouts you'll have oil shift away from the pickup tube in the pan and then you get that oil pressure light and bad things can potentially happen if you're pushing the engine at that moment. But with an extra 1L of oil that won't happen nearly as easily.

      I generally wouldn't recommend the oil pump delete to anyone without a significantly modified car that runs high RPMs and/or track use, and I also would never recommend the unfortunately popular 1.8T oil pump swap as it is not as seamless nor as safe as many would have you believe (it does not deliver ideal oil pressure either).

      You're generally unlikely to encounter oil pump failure unless you are A) modified enough to reach those limits, or B) have poor maintenance practices (bad oil, bad oil change intervals, non-OEM oil fitler, etc.)


      The new LM MolyGen or whatever it is called is not as good as the oil that was discussed thoroughly in this thread. I strongly recommend you stick to the LM Leichtlauf (part number 2332).

      If you engine sounds "angrier", and if that's not in your head, then that is a bad thing.
      Last edited by Thy_Harrowing; 11-08-2019 at 06:55 PM.
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    3. 12-02-2019 10:30 AM #27
      Quote Originally Posted by Barn01 View Post
      Thy_Harrowing covered a lot of ground but I'll reiterate a few items.

      - If you live in a climate that gets below freezing in the winter then I would change the PCV to the latest rev. They are notorious for sticking when it's cold. Signs are rough idle and sometimes white smoke out the tailpipe while driving.

      Can I get more information on this?? This might be what I'm dealing with at the moment. Every winter I have really bad starts, rough idling, engine sputtering out and dying unless I give it lots of gas, and after about 60-70 seconds it's warmed up, everything is fine.

      What is this new rev PCV? Where can I buy one?

    4. Member
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      2007 Black B6 ___________ Passat, 2.0T ___________ 2004 Grey Silverado ___________ 1500, 5.3L Z71
      12-03-2019 07:04 PM #28
      Quote Originally Posted by joe23 View Post
      Can I get more information on this?? This might be what I'm dealing with at the moment. Every winter I have really bad starts, rough idling, engine sputtering out and dying unless I give it lots of gas, and after about 60-70 seconds it's warmed up, everything is fine.

      What is this new rev PCV? Where can I buy one?
      There is nothing special about it nor where you can get it, it's just VWs latest version of the part and you can get it anywhere else you can get VW parts (e.g. the link below).

      https://www.1stvwparts.com/oem-parts...lve-06f129101p

      Your issue may be related to a sticking PCV but it could be related to something else as your symptoms are not really unique and can have other causes. The only thing remotely telling about it is that it only happens in Winter but even that isn't a guarantee that the PCV is the issue. Nevertheless, given that it is a known failure point AND it is a very cheap and easy replacement I would still suggest replacing it and seeing if that resolves your issue. If it doesn't then report back and we'll look at other candidates.

      By the way, I would not recommend giving the car lots of case right after it has started up to warm it up. When you've started up a car after it has sat for a few hours, especially in the Winter, the oil is much thicker than when it is after the car has warmed up and gotten to operating temp. This means the lubricity of engine internals is not as good and you risk increased wear on them by applying throttle in this state. If you are saying that need to give the car gas to keep it from stalling and that you have no other choice then I would act immediately on getting replacing the PCV and figuring out if it's that or something else because you do not want to be giving your car high revs right after a cold start repeatedly. It will take its toll and cost you later.
      Instagram: @track_rat_passat
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