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    Thread: 2018 MK7.5 GTI - Hose/Line Underneath

    1. Junior Member
      Join Date
      Aug 7th, 2014
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      Toronto, ON
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      33
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      2018 GTI
      09-11-2018 03:28 PM #1
      Hi,

      I noticed a hose/line on peaking out underneath my car in the parking lot the other day. It seems to be fastened securely, but seems to be hanging lower than it should? Trying to find a picture, and found this online:



      https://imgur.com/31TaLkA

      Not sure if that's normal, or if I should get the dealer to look at it. Car is a couple months old.

      Thanks
      Last edited by farfarfarfar; 09-11-2018 at 03:31 PM.

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    3. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 5th, 2001
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      2018 VW GSW S 4motion, 1991 VW GTI 1.8t, 2012 Mazda 5 Sport
      09-11-2018 04:04 PM #2
      e-brake cable

    4. Member
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      Feb 2nd, 2018
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      '17 GSW S
      09-11-2018 05:42 PM #3
      They still leave those things exposed? I remember way back in the Mk1 days the cable would sag right in that same spot, and was subject to degradation from road spray, gravel, etc. In my opinion, if you can see it from the side, it's not a good thing.
      OBDeleven coding mods on my GSW

      past VAGs: '69 Type 3 Variant • 1984 GTI • '85 Scirocco Wolfsburg Edition • '86 Scirocco • '86 Audi 4000S

    5. 09-12-2018 02:10 AM #4
      My 2018 GTI has the same thing. When i brought it into the dealership, the technician, who is also a GTI owner, confirmed that it is normal. The design does seem a bit vulnerable. I wonder if there is a solution to reinforce or protect the hose more securely?

    6. 09-12-2018 09:12 AM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by southpawboston View Post
      They still leave those things exposed? I remember way back in the Mk1 days the cable would sag right in that same spot, and was subject to degradation from road spray, gravel, etc. In my opinion, if you can see it from the side, it's not a good thing.
      Agree, but I'll take it over the weird electronic ones.

    7. Global Moderator EPilot's Avatar
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      09-12-2018 10:06 AM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by Andrew007 View Post
      My 2018 GTI has the same thing. When i brought it into the dealership, the technician, who is also a GTI owner, confirmed that it is normal. The design does seem a bit vulnerable. I wonder if there is a solution to reinforce or protect the hose more securely?
      It's not a hose it's a steel cable in a protective sheath that you are seeing. They've been like that on cars since the 20's and have worked since then. Not sure other than rerouting the cable in a different direction, which would probably mean a different design for the rear calipers, what could be done.

      I've spent a long time working professionally on cars and not once did I see a damaged emergency brake cable from being hit by debris. The only failure point on them is rust inside the cable sheathing or the internal cable fraying and rusting and getting frozen in the cable sheath. Most of the time that's either extreme salt areas or from not being used frequently.

    8. Member
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      09-12-2018 01:42 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by EPilot View Post
      It's not a hose it's a steel cable in a protective sheath that you are seeing. They've been like that on cars since the 20's and have worked since then. Not sure other than rerouting the cable in a different direction, which would probably mean a different design for the rear calipers, what could be done.

      I've spent a long time working professionally on cars and not once did I see a damaged emergency brake cable from being hit by debris. The only failure point on them is rust inside the cable sheathing or the internal cable fraying and rusting and getting frozen in the cable sheath. Most of the time that's either extreme salt areas or from not being used frequently.
      I've had three Mk1 Rabbits/Golfs and two of them rusted right at the sag because the waterproof sheathing got tiny holes in it from road debris and scraping on speed bumps / driveway ramps, etc. Later, on a Hyundai Elantra, I had to have the car towed to the dealer (under warranty) because water had gotten in to the cable sheath through poorly designed seals at the end, and frozen.

      So while you can try to make the argument that these have been on cars since the 20's and "have worked since then", you could also make the same argument for:

      cable activated front and rear brakes (since the 20s!)
      cable activated clutches
      cable activated carbeurators
      cable activated speedometers
      cable activated trunk releases
      cable activated remote door locks (yes, my Honda Accord had these)

      Sure, they generally work, but when superior technology exists to replace them and make them more reliable, lighter and more cost-effective, it only makes sense to switch to the superior technology.
      OBDeleven coding mods on my GSW

      past VAGs: '69 Type 3 Variant • 1984 GTI • '85 Scirocco Wolfsburg Edition • '86 Scirocco • '86 Audi 4000S

    9. Global Moderator EPilot's Avatar
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      09-12-2018 02:01 PM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by southpawboston View Post
      Sure, they generally work, but when superior technology exists to replace them and make them more reliable, lighter and more cost-effective, it only makes sense to switch to the superior technology.
      The failures you've had are the exact failures I talked about.

      Sure there is tech out there to replace the ebrake cable but again is it really needed? Added costs and more tech to go wrong with technology that has been pretty reliable for years doesn't make sense to me.

      Plus I like the ability to do a nice ebrake turn in the snow or wet. It makes my 11yr old son and my inner 10 yr old giggle and you can't do that with an electronic ebrake button.

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