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    Thread: A Big Turbo B6 Passat Build – Comfy Commuter/Sleeper & Weekend Track Warrior

    1. Member
      Join Date
      Dec 7th, 2014
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      PA
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      1,725
      Vehicles
      2007 Black B6 ___________ Passat, 2.0T ___________ 2004 Grey Silverado ___________ 1500, 4.8L Z71
      09-14-2019 03:13 PM #26
      NEW POST IS LIVE!

      I've updated the end of post #12 to include information and pictures of a custom CNC machined subframe dogbone pendulum bar designed to perfectly fit the B6 Passat platform. Many aftermarket companies erroneously market their Mk5 platform pendulum bars to fit the B6 Passat but this is incorrect. Most people aren't aware of that just like most people aren't aware that the B6 Passat factory pendulum bar is a different part # than that of the Mk5 platform (which means different specs). The B6 Passat's is actually a little bit longer and so to fit a Mk5 platform pendulum bar, whether OEM or aftermarket, requires forcing the fitment which has some side effects.

      Read the "Custom Machined Dogbone Pendulum bar" section towards the end of post #12 for much more info and some cool pics of the fabrication process and final fitment!

      In other news... I promise I'll get to the big turbo-related post in the next month or so. I know I've been saying this time and time again but I just haven't gotten around to it with all the other projects I have going on with the car and the business of track season, on top of work and personal life, so it's just fallen by the wayside for a bit. Once track season is over - my last track day is September 16 - I'll have more time and energy to put into the build thread and I'll finally get that post out!
      400BHP / 380CTQ - 2007 B6 Passat 2.0T FSI - Weekend Track Car & Part-time Commuter

      Build Thread / Mod List:
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...-Track-Warrior

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    3. Member
      Join Date
      Dec 7th, 2014
      Location
      PA
      Posts
      1,725
      Vehicles
      2007 Black B6 ___________ Passat, 2.0T ___________ 2004 Grey Silverado ___________ 1500, 4.8L Z71
      09-18-2019 02:50 AM #27
      FINALLY, after lots of delays I was able to get to the track for the first time this season. It's probably also the only time I'll get out to the track this season as I have too much going on to get out there before it gets colder. Next year will hopefully be different and I'll hopefully get started with track days early on in the season. But for now, enjoy this pretty length vid of some highlights. Apologies for the quality, I don't have the best setup for this kind of recording, although to be honest the video was actually pretty clear before it got compressed a lot to go online.

      https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=p5dH...ature=youtu.be
      400BHP / 380CTQ - 2007 B6 Passat 2.0T FSI - Weekend Track Car & Part-time Commuter

      Build Thread / Mod List:
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...-Track-Warrior

    4. Member
      Join Date
      Dec 7th, 2014
      Location
      PA
      Posts
      1,725
      Vehicles
      2007 Black B6 ___________ Passat, 2.0T ___________ 2004 Grey Silverado ___________ 1500, 4.8L Z71
      09-26-2019 07:50 PM #28
      Update on Upcoming Mods

      Well folks, the trend towards a more track-oriented car continues. My time at the track this past 2019 season made me come to terms with one major problem with my build that I was not previously looking far ahead or clearly enough to see coming... my build runs too HOT!

      It would already run a tad on the hot side on the street if I was driving hard but the track is just a completely different ball game. My coolant temps at the track would reach 240F rather quickly and while they system was able to regulate it enough to get them back down, they'd spike back up at times too. I can only imagine what the oil temps were; I don't have a gauge for that but I'm sure they were not great. I'm already pushing this engine to its limits on power so I cannot afford to add additional stress with heat, if I ignore those issues it will doom my engine; I would not expect it to last a full 2020 season in those conditions so I have to do something.

      Up until recently I was of the mindset that I'd just make it as long as I can on this engine without going out of my way to baby it because the sooner I have an excuse or just have the money saved to do an engine build the better... but after this last season I realize that is not the right approach because if I don't take care of these heat management issues it would be bad for my future hypothetical build engine too. Heat management must be dealt with as priority #1. Therefore, I plan to do the following over Winter in prep for 2020 track season:

      1) Remove my Wagner Tuning IC in favor of a Treadstone TR8C "true" FMIC: I do not do this lightly because the Wagner Tuning IC (which I will cover thoroughly in my retro-active BT build post I have yet to finish), is a beast. It is of phenomenal quality and it is very effective in and of itself... however, it has one downside. It is enormous and it is thick, so it substantially reduced airflow to the radiator behind it and I blame that for at least 50% of my issues with coolant temps at the track and even high-ish temps on the street. Do NOT be fooled; contrary to popular belief, "true" FMIC are NOT better than a good quality stock location IC (not on their own merits anyway) and I will explain that thoroughly in my BT build post that I'm working on, but THIS situation I'm having is basically the one case in which the FMIC is the better choice. Heavy abuse/performance driving necessitates better flow to the radiator and much space between the radiator and IC.

      The TR8C is large, for a FMIC, and it does not come with any kind of kit for mounting. It is just a core. I will be fabricating my own mounting and piping solutions so expect some great photo bombing when it's done!

      2) Replace factory water-cooled oil cooler w/ external air-cooled unit: The factory oil cooler is cooled via the water/coolant mixture. This means, similar to the oil cooler/radiator relationship when they are too close, if one is getting too hot then the other is going to get too hot and it becomes a cyclical issue where they have a hard time regulating themselves. The solution is to separate them. I will be removing the factory cooler in favor of an external air-cooled oil cooler which I will mount somewhere near the slat/cover where for fog-light (if I had one) on the driver's side corner. I will either cut vents in it or just remove it entirely to feed cool air right to the new oil cooler.

      3) Install oil temp and oil pressure gauges: Pretty self-explanatory... I really want to know what my oil temps are at now. Of course, it'll be too late to know how bad they WERE, but at least I'll know how good they (hopefully) are after all these mods. I also want to know the oil pressure. Other then the obvious reason that it is good to know for the sake of engine health, I also want to know because: A) oil pressure can drop during very hard right-handers because oil sloshes away from the oil pump pickup tube in the pan; B) I am going to be deleting the balance shaft assembly in the oil pump and want to make sure everything remains good there; C) low oil pressure can give early warnings of issues with engine internal tolerances

      4) Install a full-blown water/meth injection setup: Let me be clear, I never wanted this. I swore I'd never get sucked up into the WMI craze because it's not all it is cracked up to be. At least not the way most people use it these days. Most people are using it as supplementary fueling and octane boosting to suffice for insufficient primary fueling so that they can still run very advanced timing and make lots more power. It does work for that, surely. But it's very foolish. These folks ramble about how their electronic safety systems will save them if the WMI stops spraying just the right amount for even a second (and it will because it is a matter of WHEN not IF)... Then I ask them: "Do you really think if your engine is rotating at, say, 6000RPMs / 100 rotations per SECOND, multiplied by the frequency of the intake and combustion strokes for your W/M solution, per cylinder, per revolution, that your safety system is going to step in and pull timing in time to stop you from melting a piston or worse?" Usually I get no response because there is no good response. There's no chance. The safety systems would have to be predictive, not reactive, to protect in that scenario. WMI is simply not safe to rely on. It also doesn't clean intake valves nearly as well as people say. A lot of folks say that there basic post-intercooler WMI nozzle is keeping their intake valves squeaky free of carbon... well, if that is true then they are not reaping the full benefits of the WMI because the solution should be completely atomized and evaporated long BEFORE it hits the intake valves. If it isn't then it isn't cooling the air as much as it could. The only way that you can have a bit of intake cleaning action is if you have direct port injected WMI at your intake manifold runners but even then, a majority of the solution should be evaporated before it hits the valve stems if it is going to do its job to the greatest extent possible for cooling. So the valve cleaning action of WMI is greatly overstated; a properly setup WMI system is almost (but not entirely) mutually exclusive with any significant valve cleaning action; but, yes, it will certainly help.

      That said, I'm very critical of WMI and most peoples reasons for using it, but there is one good reason to use it and that is obviously for COOLING. I will be running a post-turbo + post-intercooler + direct port injection setup which will massively decrease intake air temps, massively reduce the demands on the smaller IC I'll be running, and massively reduce combustion temps which, in turn, will mean reduced exhaust gas temps, which will then mean reduced turbocharger temps, all of which will mean much lower coolant and oil temps and a happier running engine/turbo. Everything will be cooler and happer; heat is the ENEMY for any car, especially a track car. Bonus: the latent advantages granted by lower temps for combustion and the fact that I'll have no timing pull even under the hardest usage will grant passive power increases despite not tuning for the octane boost at all; I would expect between 5-10% HP max (20-40HP)

      5) Deleting oil pump balance shaft units: I'll get into more depth on this one in a future post in terms of WHY, for those of you who don't already know about the notorious oil pump balance shaft issues. In short, removing the balance shafts will eliminate a major failure point of this engine for high HP, high revving builds, as well as increase oil capacity and thus reduce chances of oil starvation during tight right-hand cornering at the track, and even free up some power. The reduced rotation mass linked to the crankshaft will probably free up something like 5% HP (about 20HP), similar to how a Fluidampr pulley mod can free up 10-20hp.


      __________________________________________________ __________________


      Okay... I got into a little more detail then I meant to there... I'll leave it at that, but rest assured that's only a snippet of what is to come. After I've finished my BT build post and then my subsequent post about the above mods when they are done, readers should have a pretty damn thorough understanding of what it takes to build a properly reliable high HP stock-engine 2.0T and all the principles that one needs to consider that go into reliability. It's anyone's guess how long this stock engine will last but it's already lasted a good deal of time considering the level of abuse I put it through and considering how much power I'm asking of it. Unless this last season took its toll on it in an irreversible manner then I suspect that with the above modifications it should make it through 2020 track season and that would be damn impressive (especially consider I fully expect to be around the 440bhp mark and a commensurate amount of torque by that point).
      400BHP / 380CTQ - 2007 B6 Passat 2.0T FSI - Weekend Track Car & Part-time Commuter

      Build Thread / Mod List:
      https://forums.vwvortex.com/showthre...-Track-Warrior

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