VWVortex.com - My First House
Username or Email Address
Do you already have an account?
Forgot your password?
  • Log in or Sign up

    VWVortex


    Results 1 to 19 of 19

    Thread: My First House

    1. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      01-12-2019 07:37 AM #1
      TLDR: want to replace plaster wall with wood planks. Looking for advice or opinions. Thanks!

      Iíve posted about my garage floor already but I wanted to keep some kind of record of progress of work done to my first house. I really donít like paying other people to do work that I can do myself. My knowledge about home repair is very limited so I am open to suggestions and opinions. Built in 1939, what really drew me to this two story home is the two car garage.



      I moved in at the end of last March and so far Iíve replaced the roof and had (half) of the no longer used chimney removed. The chimney was on the front of the house with a fireplace but the fireplace was covered before I moved in. The flashing between the roof and the chimney had failed at some point and during a week long rain storm at the end of last summer I got some water damage on part of the front wall in the living room.



      Now what Iíd like to do is take down this wall and the rest of the chimney and put up 1x4 or 1x6 slays and stain them. In my head it seems like it would be easier than drywall and I am sick of this plaster.



      Honestly I have no idea of how to go about this. The guy that fixed the hole in the wall said I can just use a box cutter to cut out the old wall. I tried pushing a blade in there and it was not as easy as he made it look. So my next thought is to get a sledgehammer and start going to town carefully so I donít damage the outer wall. Hereís the rest of the exposed chimney inside the front closet:











      Thatís all Iíve got for now. Iíve been sitting on this for months and would really like to do something about it. Any advice would be greatly appreciated. Thanks for looking!

    2. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    3. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 25th, 2009
      Location
      NOVA
      Posts
      4,260
      Vehicles
      2012 CC R line, 61 Merc. 220b
      01-12-2019 03:08 PM #2
      i cant offer any advice, except if you really want to do that, then call a professional to give you a quote. Pay attention and ask about the steps hed take to do the job, and then research those steps on your own and do them if you are really confident.

    4. Member
      Join Date
      Mar 20th, 2001
      Posts
      17,832
      Vehicles
      2007 Porsche Cayman 5MT; 2009 VW Passat Highline Wagon 6MT; 2017 VW Golf R 6MT Tech Pack
      01-14-2019 05:28 PM #3
      Have you verified whether or not you will be removing any significant structural support?
      Quote Originally Posted by 20aeman View Post
      No, the real enthusiast vehicle would be the RX8. It combines V12 Lamborghini gas mileage with Hyundai Genesis 4cyl. performance.

    5. Remove Advertisements

      Advertisements
       

    6. Member XClayX's Avatar
      Join Date
      Apr 30th, 2005
      Location
      Minnesota
      Posts
      5,239
      Vehicles
      2016 Mazda CX5 Touring AWD, 2002 Chrysler Town and Lumber
      01-15-2019 08:51 AM #4
      A box cutter would work for Sheetrock but likely not be effective on plaster and lath (wood strips supporting plaster). I'm not a professional, I don't do this for a living, consult someone.... It might be easier to remove the plaster/lath, ceiling etc. Sheetrock the entire thing and start over.

      In my opinion covering up that ceiling texture and wall texture looks tough. Skim coating might work or create a huge mess.

      Alternatively, my parents own a 1920s house solid plaster lath everywhere. In several rooms they paid someone to come in and 1/4 sheetrock over everything instead of fight with aging cracking plaster.

    7. Member MolotovMan's Avatar
      Join Date
      Jul 7th, 2006
      Location
      Northern VA
      Posts
      884
      Vehicles
      '94 FD RX-7
      01-16-2019 01:06 PM #5
      If the top of the chimney was already removed and the roof was decked and finished over when it was recently put on then buy a demolition hammer and go to work. Protect the floor with some plywood and put up painter's plastic to keep the dust down, a HEPA filtered fan blowing out of the space will help keep the dust down as well. Demolition hammer the brick out and drop it into a small rented roll off dumpster.

      Since the house is so old some of that paint may be lead based and there could be asbestos in the plaster. Any qualified company will test for those things before started and the price will go up significantly due to abatement. If you have children you should have proper abatement performed if proceeding with the work, exposure to lead dust in small children can cause severe developmental issues.

    8. Member VDubby18's Avatar
      Join Date
      Oct 15th, 2007
      Location
      TX
      Posts
      3,851
      Vehicles
      Silverado
      01-21-2019 11:32 PM #6
      How's it going?

    9. Senior Member LT1M21Stingray's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 13th, 2006
      Location
      Somewhere North of Lyon Mountain.
      Posts
      23,073
      Vehicles
      SR71 C30 t53a/b/b
      01-26-2019 11:29 PM #7
      ;tldr

      Tearing down plaster walls create a huge mess. Plaster dust everywhere.

      I did 1/2" sheetrock over plaster wall when I renovated my 1910 house. If you don't like the texture wall, that is the easiest way to go.
      Quote Originally Posted by Mk1Madness
      Back when making your car faster and better handling was the big thing.
      Quote Originally Posted by Tavarish
      The car's best safety feature includes ejecting you in the moment of impact and wishing you the best of luck.
      Buy my couch!

    10. Member
      Join Date
      May 27th, 2008
      Location
      Malvern, PA
      Posts
      7,871
      Vehicles
      '19 5500, '15 1500, '98 5.3L TJ, '01 DT466 4700LP
      01-28-2019 09:13 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by MolotovMan View Post
      fan blowing out of the space will help keep the dust down as well
      Pro move.
      Negative pressure on the work area keeps the rest of the house clean & a clean house makes for a quiet owner.

    11. Senior Member Jettavr666's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 5th, 2000
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      23,273
      Vehicles
      Manual Avant
      05-16-2019 01:03 PM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by LT1M21Stingray View Post
      ;tldr

      Tearing down plaster walls create a huge mess. Plaster dust everywhere.

      I did 1/2" sheetrock over plaster wall when I renovated my 1910 house. If you don't like the texture wall, that is the easiest way to go.
      Truth. Removing lath and plastic is time consuming, kind of difficult, and incredibly messy. There are plenty of youtube videos on how to do it if you are so inclined, but you will need a dumpster if you do even an average sized room.

      As for home repair, a good all inclusive book from home depot or such is a good guide to start, then again, just watch youtube. You can learn pretty much anything on there now.

    12. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      06-04-2019 08:45 PM #10
      Ok everyone, first off, thank you so much for the replies. It has given me a lot to consider when planning for this task. I know it has be about six months since I actually started this thread, but thanks to the Navy I have been away from home on training since January and will finally be back in about two weeks. Right now my plan is:

      1) Section off the front wall area with a plastic "wall" and plywood on the floor with a fan blowing out of the front window.
      2) (Assuming it is not true plaster and just drywall covered with texture(?)) Use a drywall saw to cut out sections of the wall at a time until the front wall is clear.
      3) Demolition hammer to the rest of the brick/chimney.
      4) Insulation in the front where there is none currently.
      5) Put up new drywall/plaster/paint.
      6) Floor over where the chimney was and molding for the new wall.

      Once I get home I will definitely post more pics as this process goes along. I think it shouldn't take more than a few days after work and a weekend.

      Thanks again for all of the advice!


    13. Senior Member Jettavr666's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 5th, 2000
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      23,273
      Vehicles
      Manual Avant
      06-05-2019 12:57 PM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by fresh_paint View Post
      Ok everyone, first off, thank you so much for the replies. It has given me a lot to consider when planning for this task. I know it has be about six months since I actually started this thread, but thanks to the Navy I have been away from home on training since January and will finally be back in about two weeks. Right now my plan is:

      1) Section off the front wall area with a plastic "wall" and plywood on the floor with a fan blowing out of the front window.
      2) (Assuming it is not true plaster and just drywall covered with texture(?)) Use a drywall saw to cut out sections of the wall at a time until the front wall is clear.
      3) Demolition hammer to the rest of the brick/chimney.
      4) Insulation in the front where there is none currently.
      5) Put up new drywall/plaster/paint.
      6) Floor over where the chimney was and molding for the new wall.

      Once I get home I will definitely post more pics as this process goes along. I think it shouldn't take more than a few days after work and a weekend.

      Thanks again for all of the advice!

      you dont need plywood on the flood, just cardboard construction floor covering. it comes in a roll and is about 1/16" or 1mm thick. It will protect even against most bricks. That age of home is a crapshoot if its thick plastic board or lath and plaster allover, either way the plaster is MUCH harder that whats used today. Id recommend using a grinder with a masonary cutting wheel to get through it. Also you NEED!! a good respirator, one rated for N99, not just the white dust masks that do nothing. Theres a good chance there is lead in your paint, and you dont want to breath that or ANY silica dust.

      https://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-Mediu...A1-C/202080148

      You will want a good high CFM fan like this. Just buy it, you will use it for other projects.

      https://www.homedepot.com/p/B-Air-VP...0-BL/303793378

      Make sure you have a good positive pressure situation so the dusty air gets forced out. I would put the blower on the clean side of the plastic, then open the front winter to help force the dirty air out. You can do the reverse too, but it may clog up the fan. Demo isnt hard, just time consuming.

      If you are looking for cheap consumer grade tools that wont be used often, Harbor Freight is your friend.

    14. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      06-05-2019 08:24 PM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by Jettavr666 View Post
      you dont need plywood on the flood, just cardboard construction floor covering. it comes in a roll and is about 1/16" or 1mm thick. It will protect even against most bricks. That age of home is a crapshoot if its thick plastic board or lath and plaster allover, either way the plaster is MUCH harder that whats used today. Id recommend using a grinder with a masonary cutting wheel to get through it. Also you NEED!! a good respirator, one rated for N99, not just the white dust masks that do nothing. Theres a good chance there is lead in your paint, and you dont want to breath that or ANY silica dust.

      https://www.homedepot.com/p/3M-Mediu...A1-C/202080148

      You will want a good high CFM fan like this. Just buy it, you will use it for other projects.

      https://www.homedepot.com/p/B-Air-VP...0-BL/303793378

      Make sure you have a good positive pressure situation so the dusty air gets forced out. I would put the blower on the clean side of the plastic, then open the front winter to help force the dirty air out. You can do the reverse too, but it may clog up the fan. Demo isnt hard, just time consuming.

      If you are looking for cheap consumer grade tools that wont be used often, Harbor Freight is your friend.
      Good to know about the cardboard construction floor covering, I am sure it is a bit cheaper, which I am kind of looking for right now. I will definitely be getting more acquainted with my local harbor freight!

      I have a drawing of what I had in mind for fan placement but I cannot upload right now. I will try to post it this weekend.


    15. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      06-08-2019 08:47 PM #13
      Ok here is the rough sketch of what I had in mind for the fan:


    16. Senior Member Jettavr666's Avatar
      Join Date
      Dec 5th, 2000
      Location
      Chicago
      Posts
      23,273
      Vehicles
      Manual Avant
      06-11-2019 01:59 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by fresh_paint View Post
      Ok here is the rough sketch of what I had in mind for the fan:

      Thats fine, but remember you need incoming fresh air and exhaust air. so pick a space to put an opening to let fresh air come in so the exhaust fan can work

    17. Moderator 03_uni-B's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 6th, 2005
      Location
      WV & KY
      Posts
      12,733
      Vehicles
      '12 Golf R - sold, '04 GLI, '18 GTI
      06-11-2019 04:23 PM #15
      Don't forget, this age of home that there is a definite possibility of asbestos. Be sure to take that into account before you start cutting and breathing in the dust and debris.



      Other than that, welcome to the old house club. We're on the same page of not liking to pay others for work

    18. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      06-11-2019 11:27 PM #16
      Quote Originally Posted by 03_uni-B View Post
      Don't forget, this age of home that there is a definite possibility of asbestos. Be sure to take that into account before you start cutting and breathing in the dust and debris.



      Other than that, welcome to the old house club. We're on the same page of not liking to pay others for work
      Thanks man, Iíve really enjoyed reading your thread. As soon as I get back thatís probably the first thing I should do, test for asbestos, but I do remember a no asbestos declaration in the contract... better to be safe than sorry though! Good idea!

    19. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      06-30-2019 09:20 PM #17
      First purchase from harbor freight:



      Cut out a sample to get tested. I donít think it contains asbestos but that could just be wishful thinking.


    20. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      07-02-2019 07:31 PM #18
      Test results came back negative for asbestos so I am going to start cutting out that wall...soon.

    21. Member fresh_paint's Avatar
      Join Date
      Sep 17th, 2011
      Location
      Norfolk, VA
      Posts
      3,025
      Vehicles
      MkVI GLI
      11-24-2019 08:26 PM #19
      Ok so I finally got the wall repaired. I did not do it myself as time was a big factor and I had it done for a price that was better than one I was initially quoted. Here are some pics of the repair. Now I just need to paint...










    Posting Permissions

    • You may not post new threads
    • You may not post replies
    • You may not post attachments
    • You may not edit your posts
    •  
    vwvortex.com is an independent Volkswagen enthusiast website owned and operated by VerticalScope Inc. Content on vwvortex.com is generated by its users. vwvortex.com is not in any way affiliated with Volkswagen AG.