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    Thread: It's been a while. Another Spartan trailer story.

    1. Member l88m22vette's Avatar
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      03-09-2019 09:45 AM #51
      Wow, glad you were able to get it stopped, the idea of crashing intentionally to save yourself sounds pretty damn harrowing!

      I have to say that I really appreciate how you handle your job approach and materials, you're efficient and just want to do it right the first time. It very much reminds me of my dad and step-dad, say what you want about how they handled some things but they both taught me to do a job once, and do it well, and its very satisfying to see you unjank the previous work. That's easily said sitting at my computer, without having to actually deal with it though
      Audi TT FAQ -- Outback EJ20Y swap

      Quote Originally Posted by Wayne Campbell
      I mean, there are two Darren Stevens, right? Dick York and Dick Sargeant. Shyeah, right, as if we wouldn't notice. Oh, hold on! Dick York, Dick Sergeant, Sergeant York...wow, that's weird.

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    3. 03-09-2019 12:39 PM #52
      Welcome back, Barry, your threads are always interesting. That is a really scary trailer towing story.

    4. Member VWmk3GTI's Avatar
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      03-09-2019 01:57 PM #53
      I've missed you so much Barry
      Quote Originally Posted by PlatinumGLS View Post
      I’m not judgmental, so when I see a person push the wrong pedal, I never assume what gender she is.
      Quote Originally Posted by Crimping Is Easy View Post
      Before you criticize someone, you should walk a mile in his shoes. That way, when you criticize him, you're a mile away and you have his shoes.

    5. 03-09-2019 09:46 PM #54
      I never post but Barry is what brought me here many years ago. Glad to see a build going again. Thanks for taking the time to document it here.

    6. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-10-2019 09:53 AM #55
      Quote Originally Posted by VWmk3GTI View Post
      I've missed you so much Barry
      I missed posting. I enjoy the feedback.

      I did lose my **** over this. When the handyman replaced the floor they couldn't get the body back on the deck. I assessed he situation and determined that I needed a packet of shims to use, side by side to act as a ramp, but first all of the deck screws holding the trailer body to the platform had to be removed to allow it to move. Once the wall was free it slapped right into place. Before the handyman there was another guy that started the job of replacing the floor. When he set the front portion of the trailer down he used nuts and bolts, which was a better thing to use than screws but they never touched the frame. To make matters worse he used bolts that were mostly shank with only about an inch of thread. The shank was too long, so they bottomed-out the nuts leaving a gap of over 1/2".

      About an 8 foot section of wall wasn't even on the deck and all the fasteners were already encased in structure foam.



      I had them remove the freshly stained and spray-finished paneling along the base of the walls to remove foam and fasteners.





      This is where I got heavily involved. My experience in the electrical trade taught me to fish wires through walls by blind drilling. When I was an apprentice electrician I worked with a guy the knew "everything", or so he said. We were tasked with rewiring an old house in Detroit for HUD. Each wall in a bedroom had to have an outlet no further the 12 feet from the others. He taught me a trick of driving two finishing nails on either side of a wall so that the shiny new nails poked through the floor, into the basement, indicating that the location between the two nails was the center of the hollow wall. That worked great all day. The last hole was plotted out and he place the auger where he wanted it and drilled upwards. I had already made the hole in the lath/plaster wall and shined a flashlight into the hole and didn't see the bit. He said he was meeting some resistance and tried again. Still no bit. He swore he saw the daylight from the hole I cut so he stuck the drill in further and the bit got stuck, he backed it out and came upstairs to see what I was doing wrong. He double checked the nail placement, and was quite flustered. I noticed a fresh wood chip next to the dresser next to where we were looking and found a pile of wood chips around a newly drilled hole in the floor. I opened the bottom drawer and found a wad of the poor guy's Sunday-best going-to-church white shirts twirled into a cloth whirlpool. D'oh! Someone had attempted to quiet a squeaky floor board by driving a nail and our second nail had gone into the top of the floor joist, concealing it.


    7. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-10-2019 09:42 PM #56
      After the walls were secured to the frame I tackled the electrical work. After testing the basic electrical knowledge of the handyman I decided I had better take over the finishing of the wiring. As I stated earlier, had I not there would have been 3 fried 12-volt fans. Tom bought an awesome power center, which I initially thought was a waste of money because the handyman told me everything was 120-volts. A simple house panel would have sufficed if that were the case. I questioned him is to why he used a 10 gauge rubber cord when the owner asked for a 50-amp service service. 10 gauge is only good for 30-amps. He didn't understand how electricity flows, or how 240-volts is made of two separate phases of 120-volts. OY! I got so tired of him saying. "Yeah, yeah, yeah" when it was so obvious he had no idea what I had just said. He mimics electrical work from what he's seen on job sites, but doesn't understand the why.

      So, I took over and shortly discovered that no-one had made a wiring diagram. I had to ring-out the wiring to identify everything. I also quickly discovered that the plan of using cut in boxes would not work, as they are too deep and too small. Does anyone use "ring-out" as a term anymore? When I started in the electrical trade in 1970 I started working on machine tool wiring on huge presses and centerless grinders. I had a lantern battery with a plastic handle between the terminals and a 2" bell taped to it. I used it as a continuity checker as I could hear it without taking my eyes off the probe. The bell was quite loud as plants like that are incredibly noisy. OSHA was established that year. Good thing. I was able to sort out the wiring and spliced everything out to prove that everything would work.

      We had been working on the trailer for 3 days with everything energized. I hung temporary lights on the openings in place of using the portable halogens. I was working with the other two guys on various tasks almost full-time. My role had changed, forever. I became an employee that ran the show with the complete support of both owner and handyman. Everything I was saying made sense and we spent the two weeks Tom had the guy was pretty-much spent undoing a lot of other people's work and making it right. Tom and I have done everything since.

      I suggested to Tom that we use Wiremold boxes to surface-mount the wiring. It's a trade name from my past. It's that orange surface track with outlets and switches along its length. It was very popular in commercial buildings and homes to extend circuits or run new ones without doing wall damage. I've, personally, run thousands of feet of it, back in the day. It was very popular stuff when this trailer was built. It's now available in Almond. I obtain a sample and mocked-up the finished outlet with a stainless steel plate and he liked that a lot better than taking the paneling loose and installing proper boxes. Shortly after this trailer was built Spartan started using boxes, but previously had taped up splices behind the paneling. Since they used ungrounded wiring the shell of the trailer could become energized by physical damage to the wiring, or from mice stripping the wires bare, as they were cloth-covered.

      I had energized a few circuits for some temporary plugs while Tom working on weatherproofing the wheel wells. I heard a yelp. Then I heard another. I called out to Tom and he said, "I think I'm getting shocked!" The proverbial lightbulb went on as I determined that a wire had been damaged, likely from a paneling screw, as you couldn't see the wiring through the foam. I would have used much shorter screws, but that's another story. Using an ohm-meter I checked every wire and found a wire that went overhead on a lighting circuit that was shorted, so I had him replace it after taking the paneling down. The shell was energize only when the lights were on, making it a little more difficult to trace. The body energized the frame which energized the axles which energized poor Tom, sitting on concrete. The trailer was isolated from an earth ground by the rubber tires and the cinder pavers under the tongue jack. He became the path to ground. Could have been worse. I would have spliced everything out before foaming, but that's water under the bridge.

      The Medusa of wiring.



      After sorting and testing.



      The exposed flake board would have soaked up water like a sponge. Tom waterproofed it, but it still would have sucked in moisture and swelled like crazy. This is a good solution.



      This style trailer is the only one I've seen with roll-down windows in the bedroom in the rear compartment. This window mechanism is the reason I met Tom. He had someone rebuild the widows, but they screwed him, too. Tom orders some new felt track and I had the cat whiskers that you always see worn out and threadbare when you look through the side glass on a vintage car. In a car they are meant to keep dirt and larger crud from getting into your door. You can't keep water out, so you have to give it somewhere to go, so there are drain holes in the bottom of the door. On a trailer the cat whiskers have an added benefit of keeping insects out. When worn out the insects and go through the gap, get down under the glass and come up the other side into the living space. Each window has a drip tray to take the water away through two large tubes, but they can let critters in. The tubes need to be obstructed but not closed. After a thorough cleaning of old grease and dirt they work pretty well.





      Today's work:

      I finished roughing in the drains for the kitchen sink and vent stack. I haven't glued the PVC yet. Not too late to make changes. I tried to keep the drain system as compact as possible to maximize storage space.



      This was supposed to be the power cord location. I used the wiring and turned the opening into an outdoor outlet with a plug-in-place cover. The cut-in box sticks out too far to get a good seal, so it will need some call or a custom gasket, or both. The outlet is straight. It's tough being a perfectionist.



      I learned a lot about trailer or RV wiring. They are not like a house in that they can't be wired for 240 volt appliances. The 50-amp service is 240-volts, but the distribution is such that only 120-volt appliances can be used.

      The larger black and red wires are 120 volts on different phases. Normally, hoping a 240 volt appliance will work wired to those two wires. The feed into a double circuit breaker that shuts off the electricity to the whole bank of breakers and is configured to that the right side bank is bed by the right side if the double breaker and the left side if fed from the left. Double breakers on the right or left of the main won't produce 240, just 2 120-volt circuits on the same phase. Very clever.



      This adapter allows you to run the whole trailer off an extension cord, up to the limit of the circuit its plugged into. It combines both hot legs onto one input energizing the whole panel at the limits of the circuit it's plugged into.

      Last edited by barry2952; 03-10-2019 at 09:44 PM.

    8. Member MolotovMan's Avatar
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      03-11-2019 09:58 AM #57
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post

      I suggested to Tom that we use Wiremold boxes to surface-mount the wiring. It's a trade name from my past. It's that orange surface track with outlets and switches along its length. It was very popular in commercial buildings and homes to extend circuits or run new ones without doing wall damage. I've, personally, run thousands of feet of it, back in the day. It was very popular stuff when this trailer was built. It's now available in Almond. I obtain a sample and mocked-up the finished outlet with a stainless steel plate and he liked that a lot better than taking the paneling loose and installing proper boxes. Shortly after this trailer was built Spartan started using boxes, but previously had taped up splices behind the paneling. Since they used ungrounded wiring the shell of the trailer could become energized by physical damage to the wiring, or from mice stripping the wires bare, as they were cloth-covered.

      I had energized a few circuits for some temporary plugs while Tom working on weatherproofing the wheel wells. I heard a yelp. Then I heard another. I called out to Tom and he said, "I think I'm getting shocked!" The proverbial lightbulb went on as I determined that a wire had been damaged, likely from a paneling screw, as you couldn't see the wiring through the foam. I would have used much shorter screws, but that's another story. Using an ohm-meter I checked every wire and found a wire that went overhead on a lighting circuit that was shorted, so I had him replace it after taking the paneling down. The shell was energize only when the lights were on, making it a little more difficult to trace. The body energized the frame which energized the axles which energized poor Tom, sitting on concrete. The trailer was isolated from an earth ground by the rubber tires and the cinder pavers under the tongue jack. He became the path to ground. Could have been worse. I would have spliced everything out before foaming, but that's water under the bridge.
      Wow, energizing that could have been much worse. Tom is a lucky guy- both to have you for help, and that he wasn't injured.

      You really made the best of the situation with the wiremold, as much as I've never liked the stuff aesthetically it is and exceptional product for surface mounting or minimal box clearance. The foam would be a nightmare but these or shallow 8 cube boxes may have allowed you to flush mount drop back switches or device boxes with single cables only.

      This was supposed to be the power cord location. I used the wiring and turned the opening into an outdoor outlet with a plug-in-place cover. The cut-in box sticks out too far to get a good seal, so it will need some call or a custom gasket, or both. The outlet is straight. It's tough being a perfectionist.

      "Yeah, yeah, yeah" Cut the ears off, Barry!

      I admire your situation, the resources and time you have now because of the business you built is awesome. As an electrician that went the local government route I often find myself bored (in management now) and think of what I could have accomplished if I put in the time to build a business early on, I got my Master's license in VA when I was 21 and was immersed in residential, commercial, and industrial work. I took the job security, steady paycheck, and benefits over the risk; I miss working with my hands and the gratification of finishing a job well.

    9. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-11-2019 10:10 AM #58
      Cutting the ears off the GFCI won’t help as the box sticks out further than the wall surface.

    10. n00b Tom1972's Avatar
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      03-11-2019 06:59 PM #59
      It's great to see you back at this, Barry. Your story telling makes me feel like i'm there watching. It helps that I've seen it in person and can relate to the size of this trailer.

    11. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-11-2019 10:56 PM #60
      Quote Originally Posted by Tom1972 View Post
      It's great to see you back at this, Barry. Your story telling makes me feel like i'm there watching. It helps that I've seen it in person and can relate to the size of this trailer.
      I was explaining to someone today that your car used to be mine, but it never left.

      The boxes aren't too bad looking. Many were wired with 3 12-gauge Romex requiring a deeper box. That could have been avoided with more detailed planning.



      With the wiring done I labeled the panel and test the 12-volt section below. It had an integral charger/power supply and will run a limited number of lights or fans without a battery, but then the fan doesn't shut off. Hook up a battery and the charger and fan shut off until needed.



      Today I made a new bottom for the bathroom sink cabinets so I could finish fitting the drain piping and traps. It covered a mess and made the trailer more rodent repellent.



      I test-fit the toilet and found that it will be impossible to install with the modular bathroom wall in place, so I'm devising a plan to attach the flange to the toilet with studs tightened to the flange that will be lowered into predrilled clearance holes and bolted from below. I'll take pictures.



      This is the way I was taught to do floor templates. Roughly fill the space, within a few inches of the edges. Secure the rough cut to the floor. Cut pieces to fill the spaces to create the edges of the template. Mark the location of the new parts with outline marks and disassemble. Reassemble using the same screw holes and alignment, flip over and use as a template.



      Almost perfect fit, every time.


    12. Member 16volt's Avatar
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      03-11-2019 11:26 PM #61
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post



      After sorting and testing.

      If these two images dont make the customer realize the value of a professional, nothing will.

      Let me know when you are ready to receive the 930 to fix all my mistakes.

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      03-12-2019 01:52 AM #62
      Part of me wants an old trailer or camper... And part of me is scared. Very scared. The "opening a gigantic can of worms" potential is so strong.

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      03-12-2019 05:35 AM #63
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I test-fit the toilet and found that it will be impossible to install with the modular bathroom wall in place, so I'm devising a plan to attach the flange to the toilet with studs tightened to the flange that will be lowered into predrilled clearance holes and bolted from below. I'll take pictures.

      Is that a household style toilet? I ask because I have only ever seen marine-style units in RVs (the ball-seal eliminates the need for a watertrap and eliminates the possibility of sloshing from the tank back into the toilet if you are moving with a tankful). Perhaps the owner wanted a little more "home" in something that sounds like it will be parked for a decent period of time for use as an apartment while home-building?
      Quote Originally Posted by Turbio!
      They make my ass look pretty.

    15. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-12-2019 09:14 AM #64
      Tom's original intention for the trailer was to use it as an RV with black and grey-water holding tanks. He even had a water level sensing system for them and had a 20 gallon potable water tank with a pump that I convinced him not to use for a variety of reasons, the most apparent was that he'd be camping alone as his wife, like mine, thinks that "roughing it" is a night at the Holiday Inn. He was originally going to hitch-up the 36-footer and head to Texas and eventually end up at the homesite in Florida where it would be permanently installed as a luxury mini-home that will be used as a guest house once the main house is done. The second reason is the the RV toilet he bought has a tiny base, just an inch bigger than the flange. I wasn't comfortable using that on a coarse flake-board base. I don't believe it was structurally strong enough to stand the test of time. This toilet spreads the weight out over the shrouded base and looks like it belongs in a house, not an RV.

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      03-12-2019 12:27 PM #65
      Smart to configure the unit as it will be used long-term, Barry. I love the idea of this being a little guest house that's actually optimized for that purpose, with the understanding that it cannot be used as an actual trailer going forward of course due to everything you've mentioned.

      Also--wow, everything you dissect just reveals more levels of disappointment and makes all of the repairs 3-10x harder. This guy really got taken for a ride. Proof once again of how careful you need to be in researching and selecting who works on your car, house, boat, etc.

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      03-12-2019 02:08 PM #66
      Barry, it's good to see you back in action. Wow, but you certainly know how to fight a thousand fires all at once, while maintaining focus with what is in front of you. Knowing your ability for photographing your calamities, did you happen to get images of the trailer crash wobble time? Just curious. And, great to hear you are doing well. Cheers~!
      Quote Originally Posted by Blackohio
      Built in boost gauge in the dash. One of my friends at the time saw that turbo was on theoretical empty and asked if we needed to stop and get more turbo. I gave it gas and he was like wait, its full now. Had to quickly explain the process.
      Quote Originally Posted by Calcvictim View Post
      so basically the OP has no clue about anything and just posts out of his ass?

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      03-12-2019 05:08 PM #67
      Woohoo!!
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    19. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-12-2019 06:32 PM #68
      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      Woohoo!!
      February 10th. After sorting all the wiring and installing temporary switches to control the lighting I started on the surface-mounted boxes.



      By February 12th I had installed all the switches and GFCI outlets. After poor Tom being zapped it became an imperative that he have maximum protection. They are all wired as stand-alone ground fault detectors. I know this looks ridiculous but this is the total electrical for the kitchen and bathroom. The two lower outlets will be unused now that it no longer has a water tank and pump.



      Today's work was a test of old skills. I haven't done tile work in 50 years, but it all came rushing back. Glad I didn't choose that path. My uncle owns a commercial carpet and tile business and I worked for him on and off. I nailed down the underlayment old-school, with underlayment-specific barbed nails and made them as flush as I could. The tiles are 13" square and cut easily with sharp scissors or a knife. The tiles have a woven backing. Nice material.



      The tile is glued near the edge of the tile to prevent mastic from oozing up through the seams. The adhesive is spread out evenly when rolled flat. They said to use a 100 round poller. I had me and a wide laminate roller. It's flat.



      I fiddled with the tile placement to see if there was a pattern or flow, but really found none. I tossed a large triangular piece on the rolled floor and it disappeared, except for a shadow line. I'll used a colored caulk instead of a base molding for a water-tight seal.



      This toilet will be a challenge to install due to the location of the flange bolts. There is no room to get to the bolts to get nuts started. I was pretty stumped.



      That's about a 4" gap. I may have to call on a lady friend to make this work. My wife has volunteered but atomicalex might be a better choice.



      I believe I have a solution. I'm going to use the 6 screw holes as mounting points for screws that will be locked in place with Locktite and stainless cup lock washers. Once test fitted in the floor holes the flange will be mounted to the toilet with the wax gasket smashed 90% of the way. This will be easy with the back open.



      The key to the plan is locking in the studs so they don't turn when the nuts and washers are tightened from below the trailer. Tightened gradually in a pattern like tightening a 6-bolt wheel should tighten the flange to the tile finished floor. Just a final tightening would be all that's needed from a contortionist to squash the gasket the rest of the way.

      Last edited by barry2952; 03-12-2019 at 06:36 PM.

    20. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-13-2019 08:33 AM #69
      Quote Originally Posted by audifans View Post
      . Knowing your ability for photographing your calamities, did you happen to get images of the trailer crash wobble time? Just curious.
      There were no Go-Pros in 2006, but here are some of he aftermath photos.

      The first wag put the passenger side into the center concrete barrier.



      The last impact put us into the guard rail.



      When we hit the guard rail the Porsche came loose and slammed into the inside wall. Had we not been riding the guard rail the Porsche would surely have blasted through the side of the trailer. The front passenger-side front suspension bent under from hitting the wheel well.



      This is the image I was greeted with upon opening the door.


    21. Member atomicalex's Avatar
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      03-13-2019 11:08 AM #70
      This weekend is bad. Next weekend is better.
      A(u). Klasse A, unbeschrankt, ungedrosselt
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      03-13-2019 05:45 PM #71
      Quote Originally Posted by barry2952 View Post
      I managed to keep my cool. I was starting to simmer, though. I really couldn’t say anything to him as I wasn’t paying him. I wasn’t shy with Tom about my dismay.
      Im slightly shocked... I am NO expert on any of this, but the wiring hack alone had my head spinning, and you are much more of a perfectionist than me.

      This thread also confirms an irrational hatred I have towards spray foam insulation. Yes, it works extremely well. but god forbid you ever want to fix or change anything after its sprayed.

      Also I know this isnt a perfection situation, but I cant stand wiremold or surface mount boxes, but I guess you have to make do in a situation like this.
      Last edited by Jettavr666; 03-13-2019 at 06:16 PM.

    23. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-13-2019 10:53 PM #72
      Quote Originally Posted by atomicalex View Post
      This weekend is bad. Next weekend is better.
      The toilet sits about an inch away from the wall, so accessibility improved, I can do a reach-around and touch the stud, but I'm not sure I can get a nut on it, but you're welcome to visit, anyway. Maybe work it in with a practice session in Japanese with my wife. You're both such fast studies, while I still struggle with English.

      On February 15th I was ready to start the jigsaw puzzle, but had no witness marks. I had no idea where the kitchen base cabinet went, which means I had no idea where the dark cabinet to the left went. The cabinet by the door is where he original free-standing furnace was. It had no ductwork, per-se, it used the cabinetry to force air through the large cabinet behind the furnace, through the drawer space and open space under the kitchen cabinet where that opened into the bathroom vanity. Hot air then passed through an area of the aluminum shower, making it nice and warm when the furnace was running. The final exit is into the bedroom at the rear.



      Then the proverbial light went on. Everything is located by centering the overhead cabinet above the sink. Mounting the cabinet to the left of that locates where the large brown cabinet (it is off being skinned to match the maple burl on the other cabinets) needed to be which located the new lower kitchen cabinet which lined up exactly with the back of the upper cabinet which told me where one side of the dividing wall for the pocket door and bathroom wall was.

      The bathroom was built from the shower stall towards the kitchen as there were witness marks of where the stall went, but nothing lined up until I realized that the aluminum shower stall had to sit on a 1/2" platform that no longer existed as the old shower leaked and there was nothing left. This is the most interesting jig-saw puzzle I've ever done. By February 17th I was pretty sure I knew where everything went. Thus is when I learned that the cabinets had been cut down to match the sagged ceiling.



      Today's work. It was intense. I bought a hole saw just slightly bigger than the PVC. Measuring off the back wall 12" I drilled a pilot hole with my mini drill press. When the holes have to go in straight there is no better tool. I used the stainless steel ring as a template to pilot and drill the 6 stems, again using the drill press. T insure the bolts got tightened straight zI slipped a 7/16 ignition wrench under the ring to hold the nut and tightened them firmly. I then used a small hole saw to create a divot for the 1/4-20 nuts to sit into. I opened the 6 1/4" hole to 5/16" and will likely open them to 3/8" so the assembly drops right in.



      I assemble the ring to the toilet base to test fit everything and hung the toilet over the opening. I'm going to cut 1/4" thick spacers to use in place of the 2 x 4 so that I can lower the assembly straight.

      The white nylon blocks contain a tight pattern of holes to receive a screw on each side to further stabilize the toilet.



      Waiting on a 24" supply line necessary due to the feed being on the opposite side of the toilet.


    24. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-13-2019 11:28 PM #73
      Quote Originally Posted by Jettavr666 View Post
      Im slightly shocked... I am NO expert on any of this, but the wiring hack alone had my head spinning, and you are much more of a perfectionist than me.
      Let me clarify. Nothing he did was unsafe. It was just not done in a conformist's methodology. The basic concept is that you use no more material than necessary. I think I chopped off 100 feet of wire. In the electrical trade you have to conform to some basic rules. Mechanical protection is the most important issue. You don't run wires in a 3 inch deep wall and then use 2 inch drywall acres on 1/4" paneling. To avoid stabbing wires you use "nail plates" to cover the area where wires pass through a stud, especially when you can't see the wires in the foam. There's also a thing inspectors like to tout; the work must be done in a workmanship-like manner. Your approval of a job can be rejected solely on how your work looks. You also have to know something about loading circuits. He had 3 lighting circuits for 10 LED lights using 10 watts each, totaling 100 watts. Since you're allowed 1,320 watts on a 15-amp circuit that was 3860 watts of wasted wiring and time. He actually had no idea that 240 volt appliances used two separate 120-volt legs on different phases. A basic concept in kitchen wiring is that there are two circuits with a minimum of two outlets on the back splash. Those two outlets must be on different circuits or too many appliances would trip a breaker or burn out a fuse. Both are on one, but the bathroom has its own 20-amp circuit. That's two thousand watts! I was having trouble with my generator and we were talking about generator hooks ups and he couldn't figure out why you can't have a heavy duty extension cord with two male ends.

      /conversation

      Yes, I am a perfectionist.
      Last edited by barry2952; 03-14-2019 at 07:23 AM.

    25. Senior Member
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      03-14-2019 12:11 AM #74
      Ugh, seeing those photos again just makes me sick to my stomach. That was gutting in many levels.

    26. Member barry2952's Avatar
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      03-14-2019 08:43 PM #75
      Quote Originally Posted by Numbersix View Post
      Ugh, seeing those photos again just makes me sick to my stomach. That was gutting in many levels.
      That's why I'm so adamant about safety. Maybe too much so. Tom and I have conflicting opinions about the tankless/ventless water heater. The instructions expressly state that it is not to be mounted in a bathroom or a bedroom of an RV, but I've had a very bad experience with carbon monoxide, and I'm gun-shy of putting that much exhaust and moisture into essentially a closed refrigerator. With the widows sealed the air exchange may not be sufficient to offset carbon monoxide build-up. Tom says it passes European and US standards, and, he states that he has 3 fans that can exhaust or push fresh air into the trailer at the touch of a remote control. A carbon monoxide detector would be essential, in my view, but he has nothing that would automatically turn on ventilation. I suggested a conventional electric water heater to eliminate the need for gas in the trailer at all, which would be far safer, IMO. Since I have no direct experience with these products it would be nice to get some assurance that a ventless gas water heater in a 1,872 cubic foot space is a good idea.

      After figuring out where the kitchen wall went I had to make one as every other panel was saved, but this one. I had no template. I had to reverse engineer it by trying to make sense of the pile of parts I had to work with. After web surfing restoration posts of other Spartan trailers I was able to figure out how the pocket door worked. The header wood for the pocket door trolley track was broken so I fabricated a new one on my big band saw and 6'' stationary belt sander. It's attached to the trolly with 20+ #4 wood screws. The wood only fits the ceiling in one location which helped to locate where the track went. The trolly is no longer available and the rubber-coated wheels were a mess. I had the machine shop remove all of the old rubber cast onto the knurled wheels and cut a groove in the middle of each wheel. Tom found a supply of rubber o-rings that barely fit over the wheel, shoding it with a new rubber tire.



      I had to make a full-size template. It is here that I honed my scribing skills. A carpenter's pencil is shaped perfectly for following the contour of the curved ceiling. On the flat you tale a little off. On edge you take a lot off. I found an orbital sander with 60 grit makes shaping 1/4" paneling a breeze. I did the rough shaping with a circular saw.



      The new panels will be pre-finished. The originally interior was built and stained in place.



      With the new panel installed I was able to locate where the trolley track went and hung the old door as a test fit.



      The door is 22" wide.



      It's starting to get small. The more I finish the smaller it gets.
      Last edited by barry2952; 03-14-2019 at 08:47 PM.

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