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    Thread: P2293 fsi

    1. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      08-27-2019 05:29 PM #1
      So last year my motor took a dump. Had a close friend who works at Audi hook me up with a new engine, HPFP, turbo, the whole 9. He installed everything for me so I know it wasn’t a hack job.

      P2293 has been on intermittently since the new engine was put in. Car still holds 15+ pounds of boost, runs great.

      Anyone have any clue what this could be from? Some sort of electrical issue?


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      08-27-2019 09:23 PM #2
      Do you have VCDS?

      Recommend you log measuring block data for low pressure fuel pump supply and duty cycle as well as rail pressure specified/actual values. You should do this both at idle and during WOT pulls in 3rd or 4th gear from 2K RPMs all the way up to 6-6.5K RPMs. Logging this data will give insight into if the issue is on the low pressure or high pressure side, which is important because the P2293 can result from several different issues and they can be on either end of the fueling system.

      Ideally you should see the LPFP putting out 5-6.5 bar of fuel pressure during the above scenarios (idle and WOT pulls). Less than 5 bar is not ideal, especially if the duty cycle of the LPFP is very high because that means it is working really hard to make subpar pressure. This indicates and issue with the pump, or more likely the control module for the pump which is known to fail and can cause this code.

      You should see around 50bar at idle on the fuel rail. As for fuel rail pressure during pulls, that entirely depends on your tune and you haven't specified anything about that; but in general if you see the actual meet specified consistently then this typically suggests the high pressure side is doing its job fine.

      Considering that the issue began after the new engine swap and HPFP I am leaning heavily towards it being an issue on the high pressure side. Was the HPFP new or used? Issues with the HPFP supplying enough rail pressure are common causes of P2293.

      I'll give more input as you give me more info...
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    4. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      08-27-2019 09:55 PM #3
      Thanks for the detailed response. It’s currently stage 2 unitronic. All engine parts were OEM, brand new from the dealer.

      The code also came on before the motor went as well. However we knew the cam follower had failed under the previous owner, and wore down the cam lobe. I attributed the code to that, but could’ve been wrong.


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    6. Member
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      08-27-2019 10:51 PM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      Thanks for the detailed response. It’s currently stage 2 unitronic. All engine parts were OEM, brand new from the dealer.

      The code also came on before the motor went as well. However we knew the cam follower had failed under the previous owner, and wore down the cam lobe. I attributed the code to that, but could’ve been wrong.


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      Worn down cam lobe would absolutely be a cause of P2293 so that was a natural assumption on your part. If you have replaced the intake camshaft, the HPFP, and if the fuel rail and fuel rail pressure regulator valve are all NEW as of the engine swap, as well as double-checked all the work and see no signs of fuel leakage around the HPFP or rail, then that covers all the common culprits of the high pressure side. At that point you will want to log data as I described above to get a better idea of what is really going on. If you need more clarity on how that logging is done let me know.
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    7. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      08-28-2019 05:04 PM #5
      Quote Originally Posted by Thy_Harrowing View Post
      Worn down cam lobe would absolutely be a cause of P2293 so that was a natural assumption on your part. If you have replaced the intake camshaft, the HPFP, and if the fuel rail and fuel rail pressure regulator valve are all NEW as of the engine swap, as well as double-checked all the work and see no signs of fuel leakage around the HPFP or rail, then that covers all the common culprits of the high pressure side. At that point you will want to log data as I described above to get a better idea of what is really going on. If you need more clarity on how that logging is done let me know.
      thanks for the help man!

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      08-28-2019 09:09 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      thanks for the help man!
      No prob, let me know if you have any other questions along the way.
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    9. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      10-04-2019 03:08 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by Thy_Harrowing View Post
      No prob, let me know if you have any other questions along the way.
      So finally got around to taking it to a local "European specialty" shop (I don't have proper tools or VCDS to diagnose). Got the cam follower replaced since it was in there, and also requested they diagnose P2293, and provided the low pressure module assuming that might be the culprit.

      The guy working on my car said according to the service bulletin, changing out the high pressure fuel sensor on the fuel rail was the next step in the diagnosis ($200). I asked if they did any fuel pressure logs instead of just taking a shot in the dark and he acted like that was a crazy question.

      Would you recommend just swapping out the low pressure module for now, and see if the code comes back on?

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      10-04-2019 06:56 PM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      So finally got around to taking it to a local "European specialty" shop (I don't have proper tools or VCDS to diagnose). Got the cam follower replaced since it was in there, and also requested they diagnose P2293, and provided the low pressure module assuming that might be the culprit.

      The guy working on my car said according to the service bulletin, changing out the high pressure fuel sensor on the fuel rail was the next step in the diagnosis ($200). I asked if they did any fuel pressure logs instead of just taking a shot in the dark and he acted like that was a crazy question.

      Would you recommend just swapping out the low pressure module for now, and see if the code comes back on?
      Yes I would recommend that. You already have the part in-hand and it is a known failure-prone part with a recall on it so it is only logical to replace it first. The HP fuel sensor and the fuel pressure relief valve on the rail are both also candidates and I have seen both cause this code as well but I would rule out the control module first. It is unfortunate that this shop is being that way about data-logging. Logging for data is the first and best way to narrow down problems like these and it saves everybody time; but maybe that's just it, maybe this shop doesn't want to save time because they can make more by going down the laundry list of parts that could be the root cause of this problem. Or maybe they just think data-logging is tedious but I don't see how; it is incredible straightforward.

      When it all comes down to it you will wind up having to make some educated guesses as to what parts to replace, the data isn't going to literally tell you what to replace or exactly where the issue is BUT it can AT LEAST be used to determine if the issue is on the low pressure side or high pressure side (and nuances in the data can allow someone with the knowledge to narrow it down even more). If it were determined to be on the high pressure side, which would be clear to anybody by the right data, then I would be more inclined to allow them to go ahead and replace the either the high pressure fuel sensor or the fuel rail pressure relief valve. If I had the data in my own hands I could even tell you which of the two it is likely to be.

      That local Euro shop doesn't happen to be NLS does it?... I know they know full well the usefulness of data-logging so if they are acting like that's crazy then that's an act.
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    11. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      10-04-2019 09:59 PM #9
      My thoughts exactly.

      It was not NLS. However, they may be the next stop.

      If it makes any difference, the invoice I just got has 008851 listed (fuel pressure regulator valve); intermittent.


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      10-04-2019 11:10 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      My thoughts exactly.

      It was not NLS. However, they may be the next stop.

      If it makes any difference, the invoice I just got has 008851 listed (fuel pressure regulator valve); intermittent.


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      I would put in the control module for lpfp. See what happens. Then try to find someone local with VCDS (put a post out on PA dubbers or any number of Facebook groups) or just buy it yourself, and do some logging. I can explain to you how to properly log for this issue when you get to that point. But basically if the fuel pressure regulator valve (what I was calling the “fuel pressure relief valve”) is bad then you will see actual rail pressure hit a very consistent peak number (which will be lower than the commanded fuel pressure) and then it will either fluctuate around that number or drop off. This is because that valve is rated to crack open at a certain pressure. The factory rating is around 130bar but over years the rating can decrease and of will crack open more easily at lower pressures. But it will typically still be a consistent pressure, at least for the duration of a data logging session. So you’ll see the actual rail pressure can’t go past, say, 110bar meanwhile the ECU is commanding, say, 130bar. That would be at wide-open throttle by the way. This is the kind of data you’re looking for/scenario you are trying to test
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    13. Member liveschnell's Avatar
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      10-07-2019 10:01 AM #11
      Quote Originally Posted by Thy_Harrowing View Post
      I would put in the control module for lpfp. See what happens. Then try to find someone local with VCDS (put a post out on PA dubbers or any number of Facebook groups) or just buy it yourself, and do some logging. I can explain to you how to properly log for this issue when you get to that point. But basically if the fuel pressure regulator valve (what I was calling the “fuel pressure relief valve”) is bad then you will see actual rail pressure hit a very consistent peak number (which will be lower than the commanded fuel pressure) and then it will either fluctuate around that number or drop off. This is because that valve is rated to crack open at a certain pressure. The factory rating is around 130bar but over years the rating can decrease and of will crack open more easily at lower pressures. But it will typically still be a consistent pressure, at least for the duration of a data logging session. So you’ll see the actual rail pressure can’t go past, say, 110bar meanwhile the ECU is commanding, say, 130bar. That would be at wide-open throttle by the way. This is the kind of data you’re looking for/scenario you are trying to test
      Well I got the module on yesterday. Did several 3rd/4th gear pulls and the light did not appear. On my way to work this morning just lightly accelerating the light came on again

      I'll see what I can do about the VCDS. It looks like that pressure regulator valve is a PIA to get to - probably have to take off the intake mani.

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      10-07-2019 10:40 AM #12
      Quote Originally Posted by liveschnell View Post
      Well I got the module on yesterday. Did several 3rd/4th gear pulls and the light did not appear. On my way to work this morning just lightly accelerating the light came on again

      I'll see what I can do about the VCDS. It looks like that pressure regulator valve is a PIA to get to - probably have to take off the intake mani.
      You do not need to remove the intake manifold. It can technically be done pretty much without removing anything if you have the right combination of extensions and crows-feet wrenches but it is absolutely a PIA. There is a thread on here somewhere with details on how to do it that way.

      My preferred way is with the alternator off. With the alternator off you can reach behind the manifold decently well. Removing the manifold is, of course, a sure fire way to get at it super easily and if you're due for intake valve carbon cleaning then it could hurt to go that route. If you are I should share some information on carbon cleaning (if you choose to do it yourself). Let me know
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