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    Thread: Identify hose

    1. 10-06-2019 01:46 PM #1
      In the photo below, I added a red arrow that's pointing at a hose. In my 96 Jetta, this hose is cracked and needs to be replaced. I've run myself crazy trying to identify this hose so I can order a new one, but I can't seem to figure it out. If anyone here can tell me what the name of this hose is, or a part number, I'd really appreciate it!


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    3. 10-06-2019 01:54 PM #2
      Looks Like the 45 deg hose from this PCV kit. https://www.ecstuning.com/b-genuine-.../037129101rkt/

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      10-06-2019 03:24 PM #3
      yep, good job, its defiantly not even a hose, its a pipe, a Crank case vent pipe. NOT a hose

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      10-08-2019 09:47 AM #4
      Quote Originally Posted by Vans_Tan View Post
      Looks Like the 45 deg hose from this PCV kit. https://www.ecstuning.com/b-genuine-.../037129101rkt/
      Wow ECS, a little high on that price.
      try Fcp. https://www.fcpeuro.com/Volkswagen-p...b=5&d=350&v=13

      and the arrow in the picture IS pointing to a rubber hose, which connects to a rigid plastic hose.
      that rubber hose by itself is under $5. https://www.fcpeuro.com/products/vol...rp-037103493ae

      FCP has a lifetime guarantee on all parts.

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      10-08-2019 11:37 AM #5
      Wow that is pricey! RockAuto also has the hose and pipe for a lot less $$$

      https://www.rockauto.com/en/catalog/...on)+hose,11784

    8. 10-08-2019 11:42 AM #6
      Im with you, price-wise. Just wanted to give them something to reference.

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      10-08-2019 09:24 PM #7
      apples to oranges, not even close to the same quality and not even close to the parts included. the ECS one is as good if not better in quality and will ast just as long as the original will, it also has all the replacement parts. when it comes to having a shop do the work or just a DIY this is the better deal.
      if you dont give 2 shirts about your car and dont expect to have it for more than a few years max, then by all means, go put some crappy $5.00 part on there that probably wont last more than 10k miles before it has issues.

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      10-09-2019 09:20 AM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by loligagger View Post
      yep, good job, its defiantly not even a hose, its a pipe, a Crank case vent pipe. NOT a hose
      Semantics? What's the difference? lol. It's rubber.
      A2Resource
      .......

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      10-09-2019 12:37 PM #9
      The Ecs link calls it a hose.
      it IS a hose.
      it's rubber. Hoses are rubber.
      and the lower one (even though Ecs calls that one a hose too), is rigid plastic.



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      10-09-2019 05:27 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by Svn Hek View Post
      The Ecs link calls it a hose.
      it IS a hose.
      it's rubber. Hoses are rubber.
      and the lower one (even though Ecs calls that one a hose too), is rigid plastic.


      I wish I had a Mk3 back in the glory days. I bet we would have had fun
      A2Resource
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      10-09-2019 06:03 PM #11
      I just filled up my Volvo with gasoline.
      It was plainly obvious that this "gas station" also offered Diesel
      While waiting for the pump to fill my vehicle I pondered the thought that some less knowledgeable people tend to overlook:

      Gas is fuel.
      Diesel is fuel.
      Diesel is not gas.

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      10-09-2019 10:00 PM #12
      well, hectically we are both wrong, its a tubing. flexible but not meant to be flexible enough to bend around by design. a tube IS.
      its still not a hose.

      PIPE vs. TUBING vs. HOSE
      Pipe or tubing... which is it? Does it matter, and if so, why?
      Pipe is a kind of tubing, so what exactly is the difference? The difference is subtle, yet important whenever you are specifying or discussing the use of one or the other....

      Pipe is designated by Trade Size, aka nominal diameter (roughly according to its Inside Diameter). Pipe is not normally Flexible.
      Tubing is designated by actual Outside Diameter. Tubing may be either Flexible or Rigid.
      Hose is designated by its actual Inside Diameter. Hose is not normally Rigid.
      Pipe is designated by trade size, and generally has an inside diameter somewhere near its nominal size.

      For instance, a standard 3/4-inch schedule 80 iron pipe (whether its made of iron, steel, brass,etc.) has an O.D. of about 1.05 inches (nowhere near 3/4 inch), and an I.D. of .742 inches - very nearly 3/4 inch. On the other hand, 3/4 hose has, by definition, a .750 inside diameter, and an outside diameter depending only on its composition and pressure handling capacity. (See our book page, American National Pipe for more details).

      To handle more pressure, pipe "grows" inwardly, whereas hose grows outwardly. This is a result of their respective fitment constraints. A given size of pipe must always be able to thread into its mating appliance. Therefore its O.D. must remain constant as its wall thickness is varied. A given size of hose, on the other hand, must always be able to stretch over its mating appliance (typically a Hose Barb).

      Tubing, on the other hand is fitted differently, so it is designated by its actual outside diameter. For instance, a 3/8 JIC hydraulic flare fitting will have a B-nut and collar that slide over the tubing prior to the forming of the flare. This B-nut and Collar are sized to match exactly the O.D. of the tubing, so the tubing must "grow" internally to accommodate more pressure. Tubing of this sort is designated by its actual outside diameter, so 3/8 tubing will have an OD of .375 inches, whereas 3/8 pipe will have an actual OD of about .675 inch.

      Note that in the manufacturing process, a properly formed tapered thread can be cut on a pipe which may vary considerably in its actual OD, whereas a B-nut and Sleeve require a much closer tolerance fit (the same goes for a compression ferrule). Therefore, the manufacturing tolerance of the OD is much tighter for tubing than for pipe.

      A Note Regarding Hose...
      "Wait a minute," you say, "Hose is designated by inside diameter." That's correct, but technically hose is pipe, not tubing. In fact, in Europe and the U.K. it is commonly referred to as "hose pipe." The subtle difference between hose and pipe is that, whereas pipe (e.g., iron pipe) is sized by exact constraints on its outside diameter, hose is sized by exact (hopefully) constraints on its inside diameter. This is a result of the way it is typically fitted. In other words, the fitments of pipe are made via threads (usually tapered) cut onto the outside diameter of the pipe, whereas fitments of hose are made usually via a "hose barb," wherein the hose is mildly stretched over an internal hard nipple on the adjoining appliance (usually a fitting).

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      10-10-2019 01:26 PM #13


      At the end of the day, it's still at least a 20 year old car. By the looks of the intake it's a 99.
      Links have been provided for several similar parts from similar distributors.

      ANY tubing, pipe, or hose will likely outlast the rest of the car.

      /thread

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      10-10-2019 08:55 PM #14
      Quote Originally Posted by Svn Hek View Post
      ANY tubing, pipe, or hose will likely outlast the rest of the car.

      /thread
      highly unlikely. i have had countless parts from German auto parts, rock auto, and the like, all fail within weeks if not half a year, either stored in climate controlled garage or just daily driven. worst offenders are POS CV axle boots, steering rack boots that GAP used to sell, rubber coolant hoses, OEM replacement ebrake cable outer sleeves, and the list goes on and on. most of them that fail dont last more than 6 months MAX. the only parts that go bad in a reasonable time, 15 years or 300K miles, are OEM genuine part there are jetta's and golfs with well into the 500K and even 700K miles that are doing very well and look very nice because they are maintained and not driven in the rust belt. If you keep the mentality of putting cheep POS parts on your car, its not going to last due to A: lack of care for your car and B: low quality parts.
      your car is only as good as the weakest link.

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      10-11-2019 08:20 AM #15
      So thought. Much consider.
      A2Resource
      .......

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      10-11-2019 05:43 PM #16
      sorry for your unusual bad luck with parts.
      Seems that the frequency might've taught a valuable lesson earlier on in your purchasing endeavors.

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      10-12-2019 12:03 AM #17
      Quote Originally Posted by Svn Hek View Post
      sorry for your unusual bad luck with parts.
      Seems that the frequency might've taught a valuable lesson earlier on in your purchasing endeavors.
      compared to how many parts my shop had go though its doors, well over 1,000 a month, i would say that a very low percentage, less than 3% maybe? had issues like this.
      cheep aftermarket crap always bit us in the butt. early on with GAP i had many phone calls to them about what the deal was, the reply was that they used to use oem equivalent on many parts but not the original manufacturers brand used when the car was made, many parts were superseded by another manufacturer because they can make it "better" and 1% the cost it used to be. AKA CRAP ON A STICK

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