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    Thread: IIHS increases side-impact rig from 3300 to 4200 pounds to align with modern SUVs

    1. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 04:46 PM #1
      https://www.iihs.org/news/detail/iih...ide-crash-test

      Quote Originally Posted by IIHS
      IIHS prepares to launch new, more challenging side crash test
      November 21, 2019

      An earlier IIHS study looked at side crashes in good-rated vehicles that resulted in deaths or serious injuries. That study showed that many of those crashes were more severe than the IIHS test and also had a more forward impact location.

      The severity of a side crash depends on both the weight of the striking vehicle and its speed. The movable barrier currently used in the IIHS side test weighs 3,300 pounds. At the time the test began, many SUVs on the road were close to that weight, but they have gotten much heavier since then.

      To better reflect the higher-severity crashes occurring in the real world, Mueller and other IIHS engineers began a series of research tests at a higher speed — 37 mph instead of the 31 mph speed used in the current side rating test. They also made the movable barrier heavier, increasing its weight to nearly 4,200 pounds, the average weight of a 2019 model SUV.

      "These changes might not sound like a big deal, but the 6 mph speed increase alone produces 42 percent more crash energy," Mueller says. "Together with the weight increase, the modified test configuration has 82 percent more energy than our current side rating test."

      ...

      "Our goal is to create a barrier that creates the same type of damage as a typical late-model SUV or pickup would in a 37 mph crash," Mueller says. "That way, we can be confident that the changes automakers make in hopes of achieving good ratings in the new side test will result in better protection for vehicle occupants in real-world crashes."
      The full press release describes the reason for the change in greater detail. It wasn't just about the weight of the rig, but also the speed and deformation of the test rig. See picture below:



      They found that their test rig was good but not great at simulating the true interaction of test vehicles with their test rig versus what was observed with real-world heavy vehicles hurtled at a test vehicle. From reading the press release, this new test rig is one of many they are testing in order to ensure their new test rig really does reflect real-world conditions accurately without the extraordinary expense of destroying a Honda Pilot every time they want to do a side impact test.

      Crash testing really has come a long way over the years, it makes me happy to see them validating their own test data against real vehicles and real-world crashes and admit things like a 3300 pound rig simply being totally insufficient in this modern world of SUVs. We'll all be safer for it.
      Last edited by AZGolf; 11-21-2019 at 04:54 PM.

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    3. Member Unilateral Phase Detractor's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 06:22 PM #2
      I'll be curious to see if this ends up penalizing smaller/lighter weight and lower cars since I believe this side test can be compared across models.

    4. Member Meroving1an's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 07:34 PM #3
      Great. The 911 will get even bigger in the future.

    5. Member adrew's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 08:09 PM #4
      I will miss the Crown Vic alloys that have been on there since the beginning



      Improving the signal-to-noise ratio

    6. Member vwpiloto's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 08:50 PM #5
      Interestingly, they and most other industries still use a 50% percentile male ATD (test dummy), which is about 5'9", and ~ 170 lbs.

      They account for a 95th percentile male and 5th percentile female by computation or testing at different positions (e.g. moving the seat further away or closer), and although that's somewhat accurate, it doesn't account entirely for things like the extra mass in the upper or lower body a 95th % male would have.

      The median American male is still around 5'9", but the median weight for a male is nowadays around 190 lbs.

      This matter because the injuries measured, such as head, neck, lumbar, thoracic, and femur are generally proportional to the weight of the test subject.

      It's just interesting to see that they're increasing the rig weight to accommodate the norm, but the various industries that do crash testing still use the 50th percentile male ATD as the nominal.

    7. Member 2 doors's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 09:00 PM #6
      Quote Originally Posted by AZGolf View Post
      We'll all be safer for it.

      No, only the people who can afford to buy new cars that meet this newer test standard will be "safer". So are we now in a never ending loop of heavy vehicles? Vehicles are heavier now so we need to make vehicles heavier to withstand crashes with heavier vehicles.

      I'm saying eff it and putting my family in an APC.


    8. Member adrew's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 09:17 PM #7
      Quote Originally Posted by 2 doors View Post
      No, only the people who can afford to buy new cars that meet this newer test standard will be "safer". So are we now in a never ending loop of heavy vehicles? Vehicles are heavier now so we need to make vehicles heavier to withstand crashes with heavier vehicles.

      I'm saying eff it and putting my family in an APC.
      Sometimes it just takes a few key reinforcements once the weakness is realized. The 2014 Corolla, for example, did "marginal"ly in the small offset test but did "good" after the mid-cycle refresh in 2017. It looks like curb weight only increased 40 lbs from compared to the original incarnation. I will say that there some unexpectedly beefy-looking metal reinforcements behind the dash.


      Improving the signal-to-noise ratio

    9. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 11:18 PM #8
      Quote Originally Posted by vwpiloto View Post
      Interestingly, they and most other industries still use a 50% percentile male ATD (test dummy), which is about 5'9", and ~ 170 lbs.
      ...
      It's just interesting to see that they're increasing the rig weight to accommodate the norm, but the various industries that do crash testing still use the 50th percentile male ATD as the nominal.
      That's not what their press release says:

      Quote Originally Posted by IIHS
      The IIHS test proved more challenging than the NHTSA test because the movable barrier mimicked the height and shape of the front end of the typical SUV or pickup on the road at the time. IIHS also used dummies representing a small woman or 12-year-old child. The combination of these two things meant that the barrier struck the vehicle at about the height of the dummies' heads.
      Quote Originally Posted by adrew View Post
      Sometimes it just takes a few key reinforcements once the weakness is realized.
      Yup. And also keep in mind that although the MX-5 doesn't get IIHS tested, the current model is as light as it's ever been and obviously passes whatever the minimum standards are at least. IIHS testing is not a requirement but like adrew pointed out, often times it's just a matter of using the right materials in the right places. The current generation Civic is as roomy inside as the Accord of 20 years ago and similar in weight to the Accord of 20 years ago. Enthusiasts have nothing to worry about.

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      11-21-2019 11:22 PM #9
      Quote Originally Posted by vwpiloto View Post
      Interestingly, they and most other industries still use a 50% percentile male ATD (test dummy), which is about 5'9", and ~ 170 lbs.

      They account for a 95th percentile male and 5th percentile female by computation or testing at different positions (e.g. moving the seat further away or closer), and although that's somewhat accurate, it doesn't account entirely for things like the extra mass in the upper or lower body a 95th % male would have.

      The median American male is still around 5'9", but the median weight for a male is nowadays around 190 lbs.

      This matter because the injuries measured, such as head, neck, lumbar, thoracic, and femur are generally proportional to the weight of the test subject.

      It's just interesting to see that they're increasing the rig weight to accommodate the norm, but the various industries that do crash testing still use the 50th percentile male ATD as the nominal.
      Yay. Fat cars for fat people.

    11. Member MGQ's Avatar
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      11-21-2019 11:43 PM #10
      Quote Originally Posted by troyguitar View Post
      Yay. Fat cars for fat people.
      my car's already an oinker, do I need to catch up?
      This is only temporary, unless it works. - Red Green

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