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    Thread: how do you see cars changing in the electric age?

    1. Senior Member
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      12-06-2019 03:18 AM #26
      Quote Originally Posted by Dieselstation View Post
      I just hope it doesn't go in this direction...

      Oh my! That's a horrible Photoshop for a lego. Rear passengers probably have no headroom... oh wait it's a lego so moot point.
      MOEW: ٩(●̮̮̃•̃)۶ Zomg Zombies ٩(-̮̮̃-̃)۶ ٩(-̮̮̃•̃)۶ ٩(×̯×)۶ ¯\(°_o)/¯

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    3. Member Dawg Dee-Lux's Avatar
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      12-06-2019 03:40 AM #27
      Hoods will be shorter, no need for them, but we probably wont see cab over designs such as the old Type 2 (compare the drivers seating position of the Type 2 and Buzz). Overhangs will also be reduced, at least at the front. Cars will become taller though. Wheelbase could also stretch to allow for sufficient crash structure between the front wheels and driver/front passenger.

      RWD makes a return!


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      12-06-2019 05:12 AM #28
      I haven't done any research, so maybe its known to many except me... I wonder about accidents, with regards to rollovers. If there are batteries all long the underside of a car, the car is in a bad accident and rolls over, passenger still inside of car. Now you've got a bunch of batteries, hopefully still sealed, hanging over you (because the car rolled over). I wonder if this is tested at all or if I'm just making up BS. Getting t boned, rolling over, and then having batteries leaking onto you while you sit in the car seems pretty awful.

    5. Member Dawg Dee-Lux's Avatar
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      12-06-2019 05:37 AM #29
      Quote Originally Posted by Fined View Post
      I haven't done any research, so maybe its known to many except me... I wonder about accidents, with regards to rollovers. If there are batteries all long the underside of a car, the car is in a bad accident and rolls over, passenger still inside of car. Now you've got a bunch of batteries, hopefully still sealed, hanging over you (because the car rolled over). I wonder if this is tested at all or if I'm just making up BS. Getting t boned, rolling over, and then having batteries leaking onto you while you sit in the car seems pretty awful.
      The fluid is in a paste or gel form. So even if one or more of the many cells in the pack was to rupture, and the pack/container structure is compromised, I thing the likelihood of one getting fluid from the cells dripping onto one is minuscule.

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      12-06-2019 06:09 AM #30
      And there you have it! shows what I know about the batteries in electric cars. Good to know.

    7. 12-06-2019 08:42 AM #31
      Quote Originally Posted by Fined View Post
      I haven't done any research, so maybe its known to many except me... I wonder about accidents, with regards to rollovers. If there are batteries all long the underside of a car, the car is in a bad accident and rolls over, passenger still inside of car. Now you've got a bunch of batteries, hopefully still sealed, hanging over you (because the car rolled over). I wonder if this is tested at all or if I'm just making up BS. Getting t boned, rolling over, and then having batteries leaking onto you while you sit in the car seems pretty awful.
      The batteries are also on the other side of the (steel) floor pan.

      Just like the tank of highly flammable liquid which is probably in your current vehicle on the other side of ITS steel floor pan.

      "I wonder about accidents, with regards to rollovers. If there is a tank of highly flammable liquid on the underside of a car, the car is in a bad accident and rolls over, passenger still inside of car. Now you've got a bunch of flammable liquid that is explosive in the right conditions, hopefully still sealed, hanging over you (because the car rolled over). I wonder if this is tested at all or if I'm just making up BS. Getting t boned, rolling over, and then having flammable liquid leaking onto you while you sit in the car seems pretty awful."

      See what I did there?

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      12-06-2019 11:30 AM #32
      Quote Originally Posted by Mike! View Post
      Unless self-driving with no accidents becomes a reality (self-driving will come but I’m really skeptical as to how quickly it’ll be made fool-proof) you’re still going to need crumple zones. All that bare chassis + coachbuilding stuff sounds fun, but IIHS and NHTSA will rake it over the coals unless it’s designed for safety the way today’s vehicles are.

      I see the hood and other vestigial ICE design elements staying for quite a bit.
      This. Full self driving is going to be like Fusion power plants--'coming soon!' for a very long time. And when and if it does come, so long as it's legal for anything else on the road to be human-driven, we're still going to need crumple zones.

    9. Senior Member AZGolf's Avatar
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      12-06-2019 12:56 PM #33
      Quote Originally Posted by GoFaster View Post
      Just like the tank of highly flammable liquid which is probably in your current vehicle on the other side of ITS steel floor pan.
      Absolutely. Gasoline is vastly more likely to leak and cause a fire immediately following an accident. With EVs that do manage to catch fire, it's often minutes, hours, or even days after the crash before the compromised battery heats up enough to catch fire. As it is, that's also based on today's generation of batteries. Future batteries will not even have anywhere near the risk of fire of today's batteries, which generally catch fire while a vehicle is parked or well after an accident.

    10. Member ohiodub_99.5's Avatar
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      12-06-2019 06:41 PM #34
      Quote Originally Posted by Mike! View Post
      i3 is an interesting but ultimately unique case. It uses aluminum crash structures in front and behind a CFRP passenger compartment.

      https://www.google.ca/amp/s/www.plas...iber-body/amp/

      This is also why it costs $40k for a Golf-sized EV with significantly less range than a traditional hood & frunk Tesla. People also think it looks dorky and with accordant sales, it’s likely not getting a second generation. That doesn’t quite make it a poster child for how cars are going to look in an electric era.

      For now its a "unique case".... because few manufacturers are willing to put the money into BEV development as it stands... also they recently said they were not going to kill it off... just keep moving forward with battery upgrades and what-not for at least 3-4 more years... i know it wont be a "new" generation, just visual facelifts and better battery tech...
      https://insideevs.com/news/377435/bm...will-continue/

      i guess the point i was trying to make is that there is already a car out there with a very minimal "hood" that still meets crash-standards and shows what could happen in the future... not saying its the solution.

      Im well aware of construction... I have been shopping them for quite a few months now... and please, if you can find a new one for around $40k, point me in the direction, lol... most of them, even base models new go for right around $50k......

      used is the way to buy... as depreciation on them is laughable... ive been waiting to buy, as newer 17's come off-lease and they received the larger 94kwh battery pack that extended range.
      /| OMGHAI |\

    11. Member XClayX's Avatar
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      12-06-2019 07:12 PM #35
      Quote Originally Posted by Dieselstation View Post
      I just hope it doesn't go in this direction...

      I know a lot of people rag on this because of the looks. In my opinion, kudos to Tesla for building something unique. The design language lately is "all new" but in reality its a different headlight or slightly different shape of a body panel. This thing looks unique in a sea of beige Camry's.

      Changing times? I think the Cybertruck is telling for whats to come next. The ultra sloped window for visibility because the motor isn't there. Everything has a aerodynamic focus. Basically a Lego style build and development (motor front/back battery in between). A ton of glass and camera's.

      I think your going to see a change in gas stations more then anything. I see your local Starbucks offering several charging ports for your morning commute. Parking meters changing to charging stations. That sort of thing.

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